Any other state student can give KCET

encyclopedia

TV station in California, USA

KLCS, virtual channel 58 (UHF digital channel 28), is a member of the tertiary public broadcasting service (PBS) licensed to Los Angeles, California, USA. Owned by the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD), it is one of eight television networks in the United States operated by a local school system. KLCS studios are located at Downtown Magnets High School on West Temple Street in downtown Los Angeles. The transmitter is located on Mount Wilson.

KLCS is one of four PBS member stations in the Los Angeles market. The others are KVCR-DT (Channel 24) in San Bernardino, which serves the Inland Empire, KOCE-TV (Channel 50) in Huntington Beach, and KOCE-TV's sister station KCET (Channel 28) in Los Angeles, which KOCE-TV 2011 as replaced the city's primary PBS station. Since the spectrum auction in 2018, when KLCS sold Channel 58, it has been a guest on KCET's Channel 28 signal. KLCS remains the fifth most popular public television broadcaster in the country.

History

Years before KLCS (1957–1973) [edit]

In October 1957, the Los Angeles Unified School District began producing television instructional programs for students to watch in the school. In the 1966-67 school year, over 700 television programs were produced annually for broadcast on various local stations in the Los Angeles area, and the airtime was rented for the broadcast of 40 hours of instructional programming Monday through Friday per week. Over the years the district has received support from teachers and administrators who have been impressed with the effectiveness of the programs on the classroom learning experience.

In 1963, LAUSD began the application process to acquire a license from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and start its own full-service television station on UHF channel 58. In 1967 the district also applied for and received state and federal grants to build and equip a radio system for the new transmitter. That summer, LAUSD attorneys testified before the FCC about the benefits of having an educational television channel for students, staff and the local community. Five years later, on March 3, 1972, the FCC licensed the district to broadcast on Channel 58 and the new station aired as of November 5, 1973 KLCS, the callsign is an obvious acronym for "L.os Angeles C.ity S.chools ".[1]

Current operations [edit]

The previous KLCS logo was used from 2007 to 2013

The station currently produces more than 700 hours of educational, information, sports and entertainment programming per year, including live distance learning courses from the California State University system. Along with KTLA (Channel 5), KTTV (Channel 11), KCET (Channel 28) and KMEX-TV (Channel 34), it is one of five television stations licensed on the Los Angeles market that continue to use their original callsigns.

KLCS has been producing since 1984 Homework hotline. Created by then General Manager Patricia Prescott-Marshall, Homework hotline is a weekday afterschool call-in program that provides students with homework help from LAUSD teachers and other faculties performing on the show. In his first year Homework hotline was presented in one time Journal article entitled "Education: Help from the Hotline",[2] and has won many Los Angeles Area Emmy Awards over the years, including two in 1986 for Best Educational Program and Creative Technical Crafts.[3]

Unlike most public television networks, KLCS does not hold an annual pledge. However, the website lists special rewards and discounts granted to subscribers who support the broadcaster on various levels, including recognition on the air and in KLCS's monthly viewer magazine.[4] KLCS was supposed to start high-definition broadcasting in autumn 2014, but stayed in standard definition until April 23, 2018, when the broadcaster began broadcasting HD 720p after being reassigned to digital channel 28.[5]

Instead of broadcasting a 24 hour programming schedule, KLCS has signed out for a period at the end of each broadcast day and stopped programming on some or all four sub-channels at either 1:00 or 2:00 a.m. and resumed the schedule later in the morning either at 5:00 a.m. or 6:00 a.m. A sub-channel can continue programming overnight, e.g. B. for creating programs or regular meetings of the Los Angeles County Board of Directors while the others have individually opted out. Instead of a test pattern, a title card with the theme Night will be broadcast, reminding viewers to tune in again when programming resumes. This made KLCS one of the largest television broadcasters in the United States by market size that continues to have traditional subscribe and unsubscribe procedures.[6] KLCS has since resumed a 24-hour schedule. Its second digital sub-channel also broadcasts 24 hours a day and is part of the DirecTV digital program package.

When Janalyn Glymph retired, Sabrina Fair-Thomas became General Manager in July 2012 after having been with the station for over 25 years.

In collaboration with the Idea To Reality development team, Saul Davis and Joe Regis, KLCS introduced new station IDs in 2015, including Eric Garcetti, Bill Nye, Mark Wahlberg, Moby, Flea and Joaquin Phoenix from Los Angeles, as well as new broadcaster slogans " Live Learn Love LA ”and“ TV's Force For Good ”.

As of autumn 2018, Jaime Jimenez will be the new General Manager of KLCS.

Programming [edit]

KLCS produces local programs with an emphasis on LA Unified.[7] KLCS also produces the interview show Between the lines with Barry Kibrickdistributed nationally by the National Educational Telecommunications Association.

Digital television [edit]

Digital channels [edit]

The station's digital signal is multiplexed:

* *The Annenberg Channel originally aired on Channel 58.4 until October 1, 2008, when that service was discontinued. MHz WorldView was broadcast from August 2013 to December 29, 2015. FNX aired on 58.4 from December 30, 2015 to April 22, 2018, when the fourth sub-channel ceased broadcasting when the main channel was switched to HD.

Analog-to-digital conversion [edit]

KLCS switched off its analogue signal via UHF channel 58 on June 12, 2009 at 3 p.m. as part of the transition from analogue to digital television prescribed by the federal government.[9] The broadcaster's digital signal stayed on its UHF channel 41 before the transition and used PSIP to display the KLCS virtual channel as 58 on digital television receivers. This was among the high-band UHF channels (52-69) that were removed from broadcasting as a result of the transition.

Channel release [edit]

In February 2014, the FCC granted the KLCS and KJLA special limited-term authority to conduct experiments, in collaboration with the CTIA and the Association of Public Television Stations, to test the ability and viability of broadcasting two television services within the same 6 MHz channel band including different combinations of high definition and standard definition feeds. These tests were conducted while the FCC was preparing for a spectrum auction in 2015. Broadcasters can voluntarily sell their television spectrum to the government and then make a profit from the sales to wireless operators. An FCC spokesman stated that channel sharing would allow broadcasters "[take] advantage of the incentive auction's unique financial opportunity" while maintaining the ability to operate wireless television programming.[10][11] The experiment carried out in March 2014 was rated as successful, although it was found that certain scenarios (especially two HD feeds on both channels) affect the video quality for more complex content.[12][13]

On September 10, 2014, KLCS announced that after negotiations with KCETLink, the owner of the educational independent and former PBS broadcaster KCET, the company would enter into a channel sharing agreement and sell its existing spectrum during the incentive auction. Both stations keep separate licenses. In April 2017, KLCS received $ 130,510,880 in a frequency auction and released its radio signal on channel 58.[14] so it could start sharing the signal on channel 28 of KCET as a guest. This change to the division took place in May 2018.[15][16]

References [edit]

  1. ^“About KLCS” Archived 09/18/2010 on the Wayback machine, from the station's website. Retrieved September 2, 2010.
  2. ^"Education: Help from the hotline"
  3. ^Linan, Steven, “KNBC and KHJ receive top honors in local Emmys”, Los Angeles times, May 5, 1986. Retrieved September 2, 2010.
  4. ^“Support KLCS” Archived 09/04/2010 on the Wayback machine, from the Station website. Retrieved August 31, 2010.
  5. ^"About KLCS"
  6. ^“TV Programs” Archived 2010-09-02 at the Wayback Machine, program schedule for all KLCS sub-channels on the station website. Retrieved August 29, 2010.
  7. ^“About KLCS | PBS for Los Angeles. Life. Learn. Love. LA ”Retrieved on 2019-01-29.
  8. ^RabbitEars TV query for KLCS
  9. ^List of digital power stations Archived 08/29/2013 on the Wayback machine
  10. ^“FCC Grants STA for LA Spectrum Sharing”. TV technology. Archived from the original on March 18, 2014. Retrieved March 17, 2014.
  11. ^"Los Angeles TV stations share a channel to release the spectrum". The New York Times. Retrieved March 17, 2014.
  12. ^"LA Process Finds Broadcasters Can Share Their TV Channels". Gigaom. Retrieved March 29, 2014.
  13. ^“Overview of the KLCS / KJLA Channel Sharing Pilot - A Technical Report” (PDF). Alan Popkin, director of television engineering and technical operations, KLCS-TV, Los Angeles
    Roger Knipp, Broadcasting Engineer, KLCS-TV, Los Angeles
    Eddie Hernandez, Director of Operations & Engineering, KJLA-TV
    . Retrieved May 21, 2014.
  14. ^FCC Broadcast DTv Spectrum Auction Results Auction 1001, April 04, 2017 [
  15. ^“KCET, KLCS In Channel-Sharing Partnership”. TVNewsCheck. 10 September 2014. Retrieved 10 September 2014.
  16. ^"KCET, KLCS to Share Channel and Give Up Spectrum for Auction". Variety. Retrieved 10 September 2014.

External links [edit]

English language
Stations
  • KCBS-TV 2 (.1 CBS, .2 Start, .3 Dabl)
  • KNBC 4 (.1 NBC, .2 Cozi, .3 Lx)
  • KTLA 5 (0.1 CW, .2 ANT, .3 Court TV, .4 TBD)
  • KABC-TV 7 (.1 ABC, .2 Localish, .3 Laff)
  • KFLA-LD 8 (.1 NewsNet, .2 TCN, .3 CSTV, .4 BizTV, .5 JTV)
  • KCAL-TV 9 (.1 Ind., .2 Stadium, .3 District, .4 HSN, .5 QVC)
  • KTTV 11 (.1 fox, .3 light, .4 decades)
  • KTBV-LD 12 (.1 CTVN, .2 D2D, .3 GBN, .4 3ABN, .5 Al Karma TV, 12.6 CNL)
  • KCOP-TV 13 (.1 MNTV, .2 Buzzr, .3 Movies !, .4 H & I)
  • KVME-TV 20 (.1 H & I)
  • KNET-CD 25 (.1 HSN, .2 citiCBL, .3 ShopHQ)
  • KVHD-LD 26.1 (advertisements)
  • KPXN-TV 30 (.1 Ion, .2 Qubo, .3 Ion Shop, .5 QVC, .6 HSN)
  • KMEX-DT 34 (.3 Bounce, .4 True Crime)
  • KTAV-LD 35 (.2 GuideUS TV, .4 SBN, .5 CTVN, .6 Peace TV)
  • KHIZ-LD 39 (.1 Court TV, .2 Laff, .3 Grit, .4 Stadium, .5 LC, .6 SSN, .7 CBN)
  • KTBN-TV 40 (.1 TBN, .2 Hillsong, .3 Smile, .5 Positive)
  • KXLA 44 (.1 ind.)
  • KSKJ-CD 45 (.1 BeIN Xtra, .2 3ABN, .3 CBN, .4 Ads, .5 Cheddar)
  • KFTR-DT 46 (.2 getTV, .3 Mystery, .4 Grit, .5 Quest)
  • KOCE-TV 50 (.3 Daystar)
  • KAZA-TV 54 (.1 MeTV, .2 decades)
  • KDOC-TV 56 (.1 Ind., .3 MeTV, .4 Comet, .6 This, .8 Charge!)
  • KBEH 63 (.3 RTV)
  • KILM 64 (.1 ion +)
Public television
  • KVCR-DT 24 (.1 PBS, .2 FNX, .3 KVCR Desert Cities, .4 Create)
  • KCET 28 (.1 PBS, .2 Link TV, .3 NHK World)
  • KOCE-TV 50 (.1 PBS HD, .2 PBS Plus, .4 World, .5 Kids)
  • KLCS 58 (.1 PBS, .2 Children, .3 Create)
Ethnic stations

Foreign language television channels in the Los Angeles area

Spanish
  • KVTU-LD 3 (.1 Az Corazón, .2 Az Clic, .3 Az Cinema, .4 Ads, .5 Ads)
  • KNLA-CD 20 (.3 Nuestra Visión)
  • KWHY-TV 22 (.1 Ind, .2 EEE Network, .3 Infomercials, .4 Infomercials, .5 Infomercials, .6 Blank, .7 Infomercials)
  • KVME-TV 23 (.3 ESNE)
  • KNET CD 25 (.3 ESNE)
  • KVHD-LD 26 (.2 Rel)
  • KVMD-TV 31 (.1 LATV)
  • KMEX-DT 34 (.1 Uni)
  • KTAV-LD 35 (.1 / .3 / .8 ALMA, .7 Rel.)
  • K36JH-D 36 (0.1 Vida)
  • KTBN-TV 40 (.4 Enlace)
  • KXLA 44 (.1 ind.)
  • KFTR 46 (.1 UniMás)
  • KVEA 52 (.1 TMD, .2 TXO)
  • KDOC-TV 56 (.2 ESNE)
  • KJLA 57 (.1 Azteca)
  • KRCA 62 (.1 Estrella, .2 Estrella Dos)
  • KBEH 63 (.1 Canal de La Fe, .4 Santidad TV, .5 EEE network)
Armenian
Chinese
Farsi
Tagalog
Korean
Vietnamese
  • KWHY-TV 22 (.5 VIETNET)
  • KVME-TV 23 (.5 VIETV, .6 SCHANNEL, .7 VIETSUN)
  • KDOC-TV 56 (.5 SET, .7 LSTV, .9 KDHL)
  • KJLA 57 (.2 VietFace TV, .3 VNATV, .4 SET, .5 SGTV, .6 VBS, .7 STV, .8 IBC, .10 ENT, .11 VIETSUN)
Multilingual
Outdoor areas
  • KVTU-LD 3 (Ind. ‘Agoura Hills)
  • KUHD-LP 6 (Rel .; Ventura)
  • KZNO-LP 6 (Spanish-Rel.; Big Bear Lake)
  • KZSW-LD 10 (3ABN, Riverside)
  • K12PO 12 (Ind./KUSI-TV; Temecula)
  • KPOM-CD 14 (.1 HSN2, .2 ads, .3 Khmer)
  • K15FC 15 (ABC / KESQ-TV; Yucca Valley)
  • KRVD-LD 23.1 (PBS / KOCE-TV; prohibition)
  • KERO-TV 23 (1 ABC, .2 Azteca, .3 MeTV; Bakersfield, available in the High Desert region)
  • KSFV-CD 27 (.1 JTV, .2 Spanish-Rel., .5 Al Karma)
  • KBAK-TV 29 (.1 CBS, .3 Grit, 58.2 Fox; Bakersfield, available in the High Desert region)
  • KIMG-LD 31.1 (Ventura)
  • KVMD 31 (.1 LATV, .2 HTTV, .3 FilAm TV (Filipino), .4 Guangdong TV, 3.5 US National TV, .6 Rel, .8 WCETV; Twentynine Palms)
  • KCIO-LD 33 (0.1 ind .; Lancaster)
  • KVVB-LP 33 (Ind .; Victorville)
  • K55CW 34 (Ind .; Victorville)
  • K36JH-D 36 (Vida; Barstow)
  • K41CB 41 (PBS / KOCE-TV; Lucerne Valley)
  • KIJR-LP 47 (Rel .; Lucerne Valley)
  • KUHD-LD 51 (0.1 ind .; Camarillo)
Local cable channels
Local streaming channels
Stations defective
Adjacent areas