Are syringes used in the CT scan

Practice for radiology and nuclear medicine

What is CT-Guided Pain Therapy?
When is CT-guided pain therapy used?
How does the treatment work?
Is the treatment paid for by the health insurance?
Are contrast media used?
How long does each treatment last?
Before starting therapy
After therapy
What do you need to bring with you?

What is CT-Guided Pain Therapy?
In a computed tomography (CT) scanner, a drug (usually cortisone in combination with a pain reliever) is injected directly into an irritated nerve or an irritated intervertebral joint. Treatment in the computer tomograph enables the therapy to be carried out very precisely. This improves safety and the success of the treatment.

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When is CT-guided pain therapy used?
CT-controlled pain therapy is suitable for patients who have irritation of nerve roots, e.g. due to a herniated disc or irritation of the intervertebral joints, if conservative therapy (e.g. physiotherapy) does not lead to permanent pain relief. Periradicular therapy (PRT), intraspinal therapy (IST) or facet joint blockade (FCB) are available as forms of therapy.

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How does the treatment work?
If your attending physician has indicated that CT-controlled pain therapy should be used, you will receive an appointment with us for a consultation, in which we will discuss the type of therapy with you and explain the risks to you. Please make sure you bring current CT or MRI images with you to this interview, unless these were taken in our practice. About three treatment appointments are arranged at weekly intervals for the therapy. When treating the cervical spine, you lie on your back; when treating the thoracic or lumbar spine, you lie on your stomach. After planning and disinfection, a thin needle is pushed to the nerve root or the facet joint, after which the position is checked with the help of computed tomography. Then the drug (mixture of cortisone and local anesthetic) is applied and the needle is removed again.

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Is the treatment paid for by the health insurance?
If the transfer to the PRT and FCB is issued by a licensed pain therapist, both services are paid for by the statutory health insurance companies. For the cortisone preparation (Volon® A from the company Dermapharm - the only cortisone preparation approved for this therapy) you will receive a prescription from us after the informative discussion and then only have to pay the prescription fees in the pharmacy.
The IST is not a cash benefit. We offer it as a private service (separate patient contract). The preparation Lipotalon is used for therapy® used. This application is not officially approved and therefore counts as so-called “off-label use”.
There are usually no problems with private health insurance companies assuming the costs.

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Are contrast media used?
A few drops of a contrast medium containing iodine are applied to precisely localize the needle. In the case of a contrast agent allergy, air can also be used as a negative contrast agent instead of the contrast agent.

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How long does each treatment last?
The individual treatment only takes a few minutes. You should allow 30 minutes of observation time after the therapy.

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Before starting therapy
Blood-thinning medication (e.g. Marcumar, ASA, etc.) must be discontinued before treatment. If necessary, please also speak to your treating cardiologist or neurologist.

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After therapy
After the therapy, you are not allowed to drive your own car or bike, please have someone guide you or use public transport / taxi.

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What do you need to bring with you?
Please bring a valid transfer slip and your insurance card with you. If you have previous recordings (CT or MRI; an X-ray is usually not sufficient!) That were not taken in our practice, please bring them with you to the preliminary discussion and to the treatment appointments.
If you have the medication in your safekeeping, bring it with you for treatment.

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