How compressible is normal water

"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:17 pm
Hello and Grüezi Wohl

As 1. I searched my friend Google under many key words and unfortunately also found no results here at Allmy, so I am opening a new discussion. :)

It is all about:
A long time ago I saw a documentary about the deep SEHHHHHR deep oceans under the ice layer on the moons Europa, Titan, Ganymed and Callisto. So, among other things, it was about, WEIL.

The oceans are so damn deep "one, estimated 100km" that the water under the enormous pressure, gets or assumes a somehow new kind of aggregate state. Since I didn't remember exactly, I wanted to start a discussion about this "kind" of water.

What is different about this water? What kind of enormous pressure must exist in already filled 60km deep water and the gravitation to which this moon has ...

best regards

the smodo ;)


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:18 pm
Since it is at the very bottom, water has the highest density at that point. So it should be 4 degrees cold and liquid.


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:18 pm
Water remains water and does not change its state of aggression, regardless of the depth of the sea.


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:19 pm
Since it is at the very bottom, water has the highest density at that point. So it should be 4 degrees cold and liquid
So I'm pretty sure that they said a lot more about the water ;)

something was very special about it ...


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:22 pm
hmm if I lean out very far now, I would say it was something like:

Due to the high pressure that has to prevail, the molecules somehow adapt like someone who freezes water, only it's actually actually still "liquid" ... I just don't know anymore.


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:25 pm
@smodo
It is wet.
The anomaly of water relates largely to the fact that, starting from the greatest density, it expands in both directions, that is, both when heated and when frozen.
And that the energy required to change a physical state is extremely high compared to the energy required to change the temperature within the physical state.
But it no longer changes the state of aggregation when it is "compressed", which is not possible with liquids.


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:25 pm
If I remember correctly, we are talking about the physical state "Ice-7".


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:26 pm

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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:27 pm
lol a quote from another site found by google after ice-7:
I haven't heard from it yet. Under great pressure, it can happen that, for example, water appears in all three aggregate states at the same time. This is called the triple point.



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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:27 pm
@Didee
@smodo

There are different types of "ice" ... depending on the pressure and other circumstances in which they were created


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:28 pm

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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:28 pm
thanks @Didee
but i don't speak english ;) So not that I would understand ;)


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:29 pm
hmm steam in high depths? black smokers already have 700c hot water, i.e. liquid water because it cannot evaporate due to the high pressure?!? ;)


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:47 pm
So first and foremost, water - like every other substance in the universe - is compressible, it's all just a question of the forces involved

on earth, the density of water at a depth of 8 km increases by around 4%, depending on the respective planets and moons, of course, on their gravitation

I cannot tell you how water behaves at such depths as you described in the opening article

In addition, in reality there are usually other effects that play in, tidal forces for example

I can imagine that, as mentioned before, an ice allotrope will form .. I think there are currently 12 or 15 known, of which pretty much all should be heavier than 'normal' water


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 8:58 pm
@smodo
Like other compounds and elements, ice knows more than just 3 states. For the ice alone 16 different _fixed_ modifications are known. They differ from each other in their microscopic structure.

List of phases (English) Wikipedia: Ice X # Phases
Phase diagram of ice (German) http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/68/Phasendiagramm_eis.png

In the German-language Wikipedia, the ice article says very little about the other modifications.


The pressure increases by around 1 bar every 10 m of water depth. According to this, 60,000 m of water create 6,000 bar pressure at the bottom. In turn, high pressures are often a prerequisite for the development of unusual modifications of substances and so, under suitable conditions, water is present in a different form than is known.


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 9:04 pm
@canpornpoppy
@PetersKekse

hmm just know how to say WOW :) sorry who I say that, but it's awesome what there is. From a chemical point of view, I'm very interested in these things, but only a layperson ;) but there is quite a bit to read now ;) Thank you


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 9:04 pm
@canpornpoppy
@PetersKekse

hmm just know how to say WOW :) sorry who I say that, but it's awesome what there is. From a chemical point of view, I'm very interested in these things, but only a layman ;) but there is quite a bit to read now ;) Thank you


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 9:05 pm
ah sorry please delete ;)


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 9:07 pm
The physical state of water or any other substance depends on temperature (particle movement) and pressure.

Wikipedia: triple point


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"State of aggregation" of 50 km deep water.

07/31/2011 at 9:13 pm
so do i really get that right?

If I have a box with the information on pressure and temperature, water, ice and steam, "put it in" and as long as the temperature and pressure are correct, will all 3 remain in their aggregate state?


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