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Apps can also help you with mental health. They act as everyday helpers ready to hand to help you treat depression. The positive thought patterns and behaviors learned in outpatient or inpatient therapy can be easily integrated into everyday life using apps. The smartphone helps to document health data and moods regularly and without effort. In this way, you and the doctors treating you are fully informed about the success of the treatment. We introduce you to eight digital companions that will assist you in dealing with depression.

Arya

"Arya" supports you in integrating positive behavior patterns into your everyday life. The app follows the principle of introspection, as this is very important to find the way out of the psychological depth. Only those who know how they will behave in which situation and how they will be influenced by special situations can react accordingly. "Arya" can help consolidate positive patterns and discard behavior that has negative effects. This helps to understand yourself better and to regain control over your own life little by little. By documenting your well-being and your behavior with the help of the app, you can see how certain activities, impressions and conversations affect your mood. If you're not sure how to get started, the app will help you find activities that meet your needs through pre-built missions. “Arya” gives people who live with depression a sense of security and helps them to incorporate the content they learn in therapy into everyday life.

Free for iOS and Android

Daylio

With “Daylio” you can also record your mood and activities every day. Writing down daily routines can help you slowly adopt healthy behaviors - from yoga to relaxation exercises to daily exercise and healthy eating. All of this pays off for your psychological well-being. All your entries are recorded in the calendar and can be called up in the form of statistics, so that you can recognize the connections between certain behavior and your well-being and influence them accordingly. "Daylio" is a mood diary that helps you to understand how your emotional state and your general well-being are developing month after month.

Free for iOS and Android

Happify

This app helps you to keep control over your own feelings - sadness, anger or joy. In the case of mental illness, it is important to be aware of your own emotions in order to be able to control them. "Happify" was developed for exactly that. The app is designed to prevent symptoms of depression. It is based on scientific knowledge: you can do small exercises anytime and anywhere, including games to reduce anxiety and meditation to reduce stress, to support your treatment. The app statistically records your information on the general feeling of happiness, your satisfaction with life and positive emotions.

Free for iOS and Android

Headspace

It is scientifically proven that meditation and relaxation reduce stress and increase concentration. "Headspace" promises to achieve this with short daily exercises. You will find the right instructions here to completely indulge in relaxation or to fall into a peaceful sleep in the evening, accompanied by soundscapes. Users report that they let in fewer worries and feel alert and balanced.

Free for iOS and Android

ifightdepression

"Ifightdepression" is not a smartphone app in the classic sense. Rather, it is an online tool for self-management that builds on knowledge about cognitive behavioral therapy. In order to be able to use “ifightdepression” adequately, the attending physician must accompany the therapy using the tool. It is a self-management program that helps people with mild depression cope better with their symptoms. In various workshops you will deal with your sleep, thinking, feeling and acting and with how you can improve negative thoughts and emotions and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Mood control questionnaires and various exercises round off the program.

Moodpath

“Moodpath” is recommended by doctors in order to maintain an overview of long-term therapy processes. The app, which is constantly being developed in collaboration between scientists and people who want to advance their treatment, helps manage depression gradually. For example, the app reminds you to deal with your moods every day. The data is stored anonymously and evaluated in a professional doctor's letter, which you can use as a basis for working with doctors and psychotherapists. In addition, "Moodpath" provides exercises that are adapted every day to the content of your mood journal in order to promote your mental health and counteract symptoms.

Free for iOS and Android

MyTherapy

“MyTherapy” reminds you to take your medication and to visit doctors and psychotherapists regularly. There is a mood diary for this reminder, which helps you to track your wellbeing. “MyTherapy” supports you just as quickly and easily in capturing all the important data about your treatment and compiles a PDF from this that you can go through with your doctor at the next appointment. Thanks to the documentation in the app's integrated health diary, you can recognize possible connections and see what is good for you and what is not. This information can also be shared with friends and families, so that the support of your loved ones can be supported during the treatment.

Free for iOS and Android

Sanvello

There are four ways you can help you manage your depression. The "Sanvello" app promotes: self-care, help from like-minded people, appropriate coaching and therapy. You can set up a calendar with tasks and save mood changes at different times. With the help of meditation exercises, the app supports you in counteracting these changes in a positive way. If you have difficulties using the app or adhering to your treatment plan, the "Sanvello" team will be happy to advise you via a chat. The app also helps you to get in touch with therapists and other people who have depression and want to share their experiences in a community.

Free for iOS and Android


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Lisa Kessner

Lisa studies communication science in Passau and writes on the MyTherapy blog. In her free time, she chases good food and exciting stories.